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Teen Fruit Consumption

This indicator shows the percentage of high school students who ate fruit or drank 100% fruit juices three or more times per day during the seven days preceding the survey.

Teen Fruit Consumption

23.7
26.9
Comparison: FL State Value 

26.9

percent
Measurement Period: 2011

County: Miami-Dade

Categories: Health / Exercise, Nutrition, & Weight, Health / Teen & Adolescent Health, Health / Diabetes
Technical Note: The regional value is compared to the Florida state value.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute

Why is this important?

It is essential to eat a fresh, healthy and balanced diet in order to optimize weight and prevent chronic disease. Numerous studies have shown a clear link between the amount and variety of fruits and vegetables consumed and rates of chronic diseases, especially cancer. According to the World Cancer Research Fund International, about 35 percent of all cancers can be prevented through increased fruit and vegetable consumption. The USDA currently recommends four and one-half cups (nine servings) of fruits and vegetables daily for a 2,000-calorie diet, with higher or lower amounts depending on the caloric level. Despite the benefits, many people still do not eat recommended levels of fruits and vegetables. This is particularly true of consumers with lower incomes and education levels.

Teen Fruit Consumption : Time Series

2009: 25.7 2011: 26.9

percent

Teen Fruit Consumption by Gender

Female: 22.2 Male: 31.8 Overall: 26.9

percent

Teen Fruit Consumption by Race/Ethnicity

Black: 28.7 Hispanic: 26.2 White: 27.4 Overall: 26.9

percent

Teen Fruit Consumption

Comparison: Prior Value 

26.9

percent
Measurement Period: 2011

County: Miami-Dade

Categories: Health / Exercise, Nutrition, & Weight, Health / Teen & Adolescent Health, Health / Diabetes
Technical Note: The trend is a comparison between the most recent and previous measurement periods. Confidence intervals were taken into account in determining the direction of the trend.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute

Why is this important?

It is essential to eat a fresh, healthy and balanced diet in order to optimize weight and prevent chronic disease. Numerous studies have shown a clear link between the amount and variety of fruits and vegetables consumed and rates of chronic diseases, especially cancer. According to the World Cancer Research Fund International, about 35 percent of all cancers can be prevented through increased fruit and vegetable consumption. The USDA currently recommends four and one-half cups (nine servings) of fruits and vegetables daily for a 2,000-calorie diet, with higher or lower amounts depending on the caloric level. Despite the benefits, many people still do not eat recommended levels of fruits and vegetables. This is particularly true of consumers with lower incomes and education levels.

Teen Fruit Consumption : Time Series

2009: 25.7 2011: 26.9

percent

Teen Fruit Consumption by Gender

Female: 22.2 Male: 31.8 Overall: 26.9

percent

Teen Fruit Consumption by Race/Ethnicity

Black: 28.7 Hispanic: 26.2 White: 27.4 Overall: 26.9

percent

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