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35.5
49.0
Red > 49.0
Green <= 35.5
In-between = Yellow
Unit: cases/100,000 population
View the Legend

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate

Value: 23.6 cases/100,000 population
Measurement
Period:
2012
Location: County : Miami-Dade
Comparison: FL Counties
Categories: Health / Food Safety
Health / Immunizations & Infectious Diseases
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What is this Indicator?
This indicator shows the salmonellosis incidence rate in cases per 100,000 population.
The rate includes both probable and confirmed cases.
Why this is important: 
Salmonellosis is an infection with Salmonella bacterium. Salmonella are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but any food, including vegetables, may become contaminated. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. To prevent salmonellosis, people should not eat raw or undercooked eggs, poultry, or meat. Thoroughly cooking food kills Salmonella. Individuals should wash hands and surfaces often, separate raw meat, poultry, and seafood from other foods to prevent contamination, and refrigerate perishables promptly. Every year, approximately 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported in the United States. Because many milder cases are not diagnosed or reported, the actual number of infections may be thirty or more times greater.
The Healthy People 2020 national health target is to reduce the salmonella incidence rate to 11.4 cases per 100,000 population.
Technical Note:  The distribution is based on data from 67 Florida counties.
Source: Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology
URL of Source:   http://www.floridahealth.gov/index.html
URL of Data:   http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVi...
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: October 2013

Time Series Data

2007: 17.8 2008: 22.2 2009: 24.3 2010: 20.0 2011: 23.9 2012: 23.6

cases/100,000 population


Indicates a change in methodology
2011 Rates calculated prior to 2011 do not reflect the population revisions made by the Florida Department of Health. The population data for 2001-2010, along with rates affected by the population data, were revised in August 2012.
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Going down
Unit: cases/100,000 population
View the Legend

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate

Value: 23.6 cases/100,000 population
Measurement
Period:
2012
Location: County : Miami-Dade
Comparison: Prior Value
Categories: Health / Food Safety
Health / Immunizations & Infectious Diseases
What is this Indicator?
This indicator shows the salmonellosis incidence rate in cases per 100,000 population.
The rate includes both probable and confirmed cases.
Why this is important: 
Salmonellosis is an infection with Salmonella bacterium. Salmonella are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but any food, including vegetables, may become contaminated. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. To prevent salmonellosis, people should not eat raw or undercooked eggs, poultry, or meat. Thoroughly cooking food kills Salmonella. Individuals should wash hands and surfaces often, separate raw meat, poultry, and seafood from other foods to prevent contamination, and refrigerate perishables promptly. Every year, approximately 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported in the United States. Because many milder cases are not diagnosed or reported, the actual number of infections may be thirty or more times greater.
The Healthy People 2020 national health target is to reduce the salmonella incidence rate to 11.4 cases per 100,000 population.
Technical Note:  The trend is a comparison between the most recent and previous measurement periods. Confidence intervals were not taken into account in determining the direction of the trend.
Source: Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology
URL of Source:   http://www.floridahealth.gov/index.html
URL of Data:   http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVi...
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: October 2013

Time Series Data

2007: 17.8 2008: 22.2 2009: 24.3 2010: 20.0 2011: 23.9 2012: 23.6

cases/100,000 population


Indicates a change in methodology
2011 Rates calculated prior to 2011 do not reflect the population revisions made by the Florida Department of Health. The population data for 2001-2010, along with rates affected by the population data, were revised in August 2012.
Zoom to:
Create Indicator Comparison Report
How are these indicators calculated? Return to Community Dashboard Home
Target Not Met

Unit: cases/100,000 population
View the Legend

Salmonella Infection Incidence Rate

Value: 23.6 cases/100,000 population
Healthy People 2020 Target: 11.4 cases/100,000 population
Measurement
Period:
2012
Location: County : Miami-Dade
Comparison: Healthy People 2020 Target
Categories: Health / Food Safety
Health / Immunizations & Infectious Diseases
What is this Indicator?
This indicator shows the salmonellosis incidence rate in cases per 100,000 population.
The rate includes both probable and confirmed cases.
Why this is important: 
Salmonellosis is an infection with Salmonella bacterium. Salmonella are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but any food, including vegetables, may become contaminated. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. To prevent salmonellosis, people should not eat raw or undercooked eggs, poultry, or meat. Thoroughly cooking food kills Salmonella. Individuals should wash hands and surfaces often, separate raw meat, poultry, and seafood from other foods to prevent contamination, and refrigerate perishables promptly. Every year, approximately 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported in the United States. Because many milder cases are not diagnosed or reported, the actual number of infections may be thirty or more times greater.
The Healthy People 2020 national health target is to reduce the salmonella incidence rate to 11.4 cases per 100,000 population.
Source: Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology
URL of Source:   http://www.floridahealth.gov/index.html
URL of Data:   http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVi...
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: October 2013

Time Series Data

2007: 17.8 2008: 22.2 2009: 24.3 2010: 20.0 2011: 23.9 2012: 23.6

cases/100,000 population


Indicates a change in methodology
2011 Rates calculated prior to 2011 do not reflect the population revisions made by the Florida Department of Health. The population data for 2001-2010, along with rates affected by the population data, were revised in August 2012.
Zoom to:
Create Indicator Comparison Report
How are these indicators calculated? Return to Community Dashboard Home