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Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History

This indicator shows the percentage of men over 50 who have received a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test in the past two years.

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History

70.2
64.3
Comparison: FL Counties 

69.5

percent
Measurement Period: 2010

County: Miami-Dade

Categories: Health / Cancer, Health / Men's Health
Technical Note: The distribution is based on data from 67 Florida counties.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
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Why is this important?

A PSA test measures the levels of prostate-specific antigen, a protein produced by the prostate, in the blood. The level of PSA in the blood can be increased by prostate cancer or inflammation of the prostate gland. The National Cancer Institute recommends the use of PSA along with a digital rectal exam to help detect prostate cancer in men 50 years of age or older. PSA is also used to monitor men with a history of prostate cancer for recurrence. Prostate cancer is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer-related death among men. In the United States in 2009, it is estimated that there were 192,280 new cases and 27,360 deaths from prostate cancer. Early detection may prevent some health problems and reduce the risk of dying from the cancer.

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History : Time Series

2007: 56.1 2010: 69.5

percent

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History by Age

50-64: 60.8 65+: 81.8 Overall: 69.5

percent

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History by Race/Ethnicity

Hispanic: 63.7 White: 71.9 Overall: 69.5

percent

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History

Comparison: Prior Value 

69.5

percent
Measurement Period: 2010

County: Miami-Dade

Categories: Health / Cancer, Health / Men's Health
Technical Note: The trend is a comparison between the most recent and previous measurement periods. Confidence intervals were taken into account in determining the direction of the trend.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute

Why is this important?

A PSA test measures the levels of prostate-specific antigen, a protein produced by the prostate, in the blood. The level of PSA in the blood can be increased by prostate cancer or inflammation of the prostate gland. The National Cancer Institute recommends the use of PSA along with a digital rectal exam to help detect prostate cancer in men 50 years of age or older. PSA is also used to monitor men with a history of prostate cancer for recurrence. Prostate cancer is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer-related death among men. In the United States in 2009, it is estimated that there were 192,280 new cases and 27,360 deaths from prostate cancer. Early detection may prevent some health problems and reduce the risk of dying from the cancer.

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History : Time Series

2007: 56.1 2010: 69.5

percent

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History by Age

50-64: 60.8 65+: 81.8 Overall: 69.5

percent

Prostate-Specific Antigen Test History by Race/Ethnicity

Hispanic: 63.7 White: 71.9 Overall: 69.5

percent